Is data singular or plural

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Is “data” singular or plural?

It is both, or one.
Depending on how you look at it.
Data usually refers to bits of information; a time, a color, a gigabyte, a song note, or a grocery list.
But data also refers to data as a whole.
The only constraints are the limits you put on the data, meaning whether you are speaking of, for example, the entirety of saved data on an sd data, verses say, the data, or information in seven sd cards.
Data is an all inclusive word for information.
But if you want to split up different kinds of information, like say those seven sd cards and also the information on a computer’s harddrive so you compare or contrast the data you might then say, “datas”.
You could then say, “I went over both datas (or the data, if we are just honestly feeling a bit lazy and feel like dropping that ‘s’ since it's essentially that same thing) and found one (or one part) to be missing a few details.
” Data is EVERYTHING.
The words I am writing.
The website you are viewing.
All the memes on the internet, but also the entirety of all human knowledge including what we don't yet know.
But I think once we know it it them becomes data.
Data is everything….
and everything is datas!  Cool, right? Yup.

It depends on who is using it.
In scientific and technical contexts, data is the plural of datum.
A datum is a single measurement or a single fact.
But in a business context, the word data is treated as a mass noun (also called a non-count noun) like water, and uses singular verb forms.
It refers to information, or a specific type of information, in the aggregate.
A single bit of information from that aggregate is referred to as a data point.
My rule of thumb is this: If you never use the word datum, you should consider data to be a mass noun.

Basic knowledge of Number is essential.
There are two numbers in English .
Number denoting one person or thing is Singular number.
Number denoting  two or more persons or things is called Plural in number.
There are several rules which help in forming plurals.
Rule says words ending in’-um’ form their plurals with ‘–a’
singular   plural
datum  data 
Hence ‘ data ’ is plural form of ‘datum’
Hint: This all story was retold to avoid collapsing of this answer and not foranything else.

Yes.
Is “data” treated as singular or plural in formal contexts?
[That is, in some formal contexts it’s treated as a singular mass noun, while in others it’s treated as a plural count noun.
The difference is not actually in the context, but in the preferences of the writer.
]
P.
S.
In Latin, “data” is the plural of “datum.
” In English, a “datum” is a standard reference value, while “data” is or are a collection of observed values.
English is not Latin.

Somewhat paradoxically, data is treated as a “mass noun” — a noun denoting something that normally cannot be counted but that may be countable when it refers to different units or types.
Examples for such nouns are time, money, heat, etc.
When we ask to learn about the quantity of such nouns we use the question “how much”.
Ex.
: “How much time/money/heat do I need?”
(But: How many minutes, how many dollars, how many joules or calories?)
We normally don’t use the plural form of such nouns; we don’t say times, moneys, heats.
Data, although the plural form of datum in Latin, is — or is treated like— a noun like the above.

Updated: 09.07.2019 — 8:14 pm

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